For students, looking the part is very important. After all, you don’t want to roam around a campus looking like a scally, or something below your best. It would be wrong to say that people would judge you on your style, but your clothes can certainly tell your fellow students a lot about the way you carry yourself, whether it be high-maintenance with designer labels or being laid-back with an emphasis on comfort.

The Student Review is looking to see what clothes the students of today are rockin’, and for this edition, we’re going to hear from Danielle Leigh Poole as she discusses her fashion tastes!

“I have to say that my wardrobe is kind of all over the place, and if you saw it in its entirety, even though it is not a mass of clothes, you would wonder what style I am going for.

“I would say the majority of my wardrobe is dresses, especially winter dresses which are super woolly and range from a silver, rather fancy woolly dress from Sainsbury’s to a very enthusiastically Christmas pinafore (£13), which I got from Primark and has cute reindeers on it! Then, there are the summer dresses, which are all very light colours and most have a light fabric to match. Though I do like my summer dresses some of them don’t have sleeves, which is a blooming hassle all on its own.

Peacocks dress

Peacocks dress

“To join these summer dresses this year, I have purchased two jumpsuits: one from H&M for £12.99 that is blue and white, and one for £4 from a car boot, which is dark blue with bright orange and pale blue flowers and leaves. I have a feeling I will be getting more of those, or even a playsuit, but it’s rather tricky (just as it is with swimming costumes) because I am quite tall , I am a size 8 and I am flat chested. Let’s be honest, these clothes are rarely suited to my body shape at all, but on the rare occasion that I don’t feel like I’m cut in half by the crotch area of the jumpsuit, my arms aren’t cut off by the straps, and the chest piece of the garment is just dangling away, we would be onto a winner, especially in H&M. I thought I could get away with red but I really can’t, so blue plate it is. I have bought most of my dresses with birthday or Christmas money, or they were presents. My most recent polka dot dress from Peacocks was £30 in a sale, and the signature aspect is the turquoise belt.

Car boot items

Car boot items

“Most of these have a loose floaty thin material and are what I would wear out for a nice day out or to dinner, or some of the slightly shorter dresses for an evening meal. It’s not that the size dictates when I wear them; it’s just that those particular dresses are coincidentally the ones that are short or ride up when I sit down, making my legs look ridiculously long, so they’re best for later events. Most of these would be classed as work dresses, and I have worn most of them to work as they are very professional apart from one or two of the short ones. But seriously, if I wasn’t wearing them they’d be more than a modest cut. The longest dress that I have is from Cath Kidston, which was a bit of a silly splash of money, but I had just moved to Cheltenham for university and was feeling great. Plus, I had worked all summer and saved some money. So I don’t regret it as I loved the dress when I wore it – but sometime later it went on sale, which sucks! Most of these have zips at the side which are rather discrete, but if you were me trying on this dress you wouldn’t have known…I had to ask the lady to bring me a size 14 because I couldn’t for the life of me get into the dress! At the time, I thought that this was size labelling gone mad, when in reality I just hadn’t undone the zip!

Christmas jumpers

Christmas jumpers

“I have work clothes with two specific dresses for interviews; both are black (which is stupid – I really should have one in a different colour because dust shows up on them so easily). Also on hot days, walking to an interview is plain daft – but that’s what I did and I felt like a solar panel. Also, consider that these are meant to be work clothes – and yet I can hardly move in them because they’re so tight (especially around my legs) and make me feel rather exposed. I have four fancy dresses: one that I would only wear to weddings or special nights (basically because its rather flouncy – it’s pink and flowery, Missi London-branded, and is made from polyester. Luckily, all this works in my favour). I have another similar dress which I wear for nights out (it’s black with fluorescent flowers – similar to the bright pink and blue dress, and also from Missi London as they do quite a few sales). There’s also one which kind of looks like armour and has a bit of weight to it (which I bought for New Year’s, and was £20 from New Look). But although most of my dresses all tie into my dress sense and obviously suit me, I also go for the quirky route – dressing in what looks either a little younger or older than my actual age of 20 (or just something people don’t tend to wear, such as patterns with other patterns). For instance, I also have a black sequin dress with see-through shoulders (from New Look for £18) that looks rather nice and is spot on for conformity and for going out at night to clubs (which is rarely the case for me, but it’s nice to not stick out like a sore thumb in a room full of beautiful half-dressed ladies).

“Moving on from my ever-mounting collection of dresses, the only other significant thing about my wardrobe is the amount of band T-shirts I have. They’re mostly black, so at this point I wear them as PJs. These are from when I went to see bands live at their tours or at festivals, and I found one at a car boot sale. A lot of what I have that I haven’t mentioned is from charity shops, car boots and jumble sales, if not passed on from a cousin or auntie. To the dismay of my mum, we share the same foot size so I used to borrow her shoes, but now I’m at university shoes are always on my Christmas and birthday lists because I keep wearing them to death (and my mum’s shoes are no longer readily available). I don’t like to spend lots of money on clothes, because I genuinely feel that this is how I was brought up, but I noticed that moving to Cheltenham has made me more prone to spending money and buying pricier garments. And I now have this niggling thought at the back of my mind that brands matter, when I know that they absolutely do not! Considering that I used to wear clothes until they were wrecked (especially shoes, as I mentioned earlier), I feel I have put more effort into my appearance of late, but maybe I should really have a summer clean-out and donate some items.”

What do you think of Danielle’s style? Are there any items that you like, or are there areas where you could suggest improvements? Let us know in the Comments section below!

If you want to be featured in the Student Style Profile, get in touch by emailing enquiries@thestudentreview.co.uk.

Click the respective links to read previous Style Profiles for Mark Armstrong, Natalie Bolderston, Dan Fitt-Palmer, Bethany Atkin and Luke Mythen.

(Featured image credit: Dresses vector, designed by Freepik.com. Used under the Creative Commons Licence.)